Using Landfill Sites to Save Pollinators

Image Credit to the OWMA

The world is experiencing a decline in pollinator species that is very troubling. Pollinators like bees, hummingbirds and butterflies are essential to both the natural and agricultural environments. Without pollinator species we would experience severe food shortages due to very poor crop yields.

Some aspects of pollinator decline remain a mystery, for example; honeybees in North America are being wiped out faster than can be explained by habitat loss or other human factors. However, human activity is largely the cause of other pollinator decline. As such it is very important that we work towards providing pollinators with habitats and ensure their protection.

The Ontario Waste Management Association (OWMA) created this excellent infographic on taking advantage of landfills (historically closed, recently closed or even still active) to provide pollinator habitats – making excellent use of otherwise difficult to use land.

If you are operating a landfill site, Cambium can help. Cambium works all across the province on landfills: from environmental monitoring to closing procedures, we have a diverse array of experience in ensuring the safety, efficiency and best use of landfills. Our biology team is well versed in pollinator species and can help you do your part in saving them by assisting in the implementation of ideas presented by the OWMA.

What is a Circular Economy?

http://bioplasticfeedstockalliance.org/bioplastics/

As the world population continues to grow, the world’s creation of waste (especially plastics) follows suit. As is common knowledge, plastics don’t decompose very quickly; some may even take tens of thousands of years. This poses a problem in terms of sheer volume: there is simply too much plastic and other waste products to deal with. Unfortunately, most plastics don’t make it to landfills or recycling plants and end up in the ocean or natural environment instead. In the Pacific, there are islands of floating plastics so large they can be clearly seen from space.

Landfills are overflowing and the ocean is being severely affected. Many proposed solutions revolve around reducing consumption in general – which is absolutely a necessity, but it is something that is difficult to incentivize and even more difficult to legislate.  Lowering consumption is something that will likely happen overtime, but it probably isn’t going to happen fast enough to mitigate environmental damage in the meantime. So how do we manage all of this waste? One school of thought is to focus on the economic viability of reusing material. Rather than synthesizing new plastics or extracting new metals, manufacturers use recycled materials as their primary inputs. The idea is to lower waste overtime due to a widespread systematic recycling of materials that goes far beyond a given city’s recycling program. This is called a “Circular Economy” due to the circular flow of materials. The intent is to create a strong incentive to make change happen faster by making reuse economically attractive.

The concept of Economies of Scale refers to the lower costs of manufacturing the larger the scale of the operation. This same principle drives Circular Economics – that if reuse and re-fabrication happen on a wide enough scale, it becomes very economical. It makes intuitive sense that turning valueless garbage back into saleable products could be cheaper than extracting raw materials; the problem is that there is a lack of infrastructure to make the reuse economical. This is changing rapidly and many companies are taking advantage of the inexpensive material that comes from making use of waste.

If you or your business are interested in taking advantage of circular economics, or are looking to learn more take a look at Ontario Waste Management Association’s (OWMA) website or check out #circulareconomy on Twitter. If you are looking to improve your businesses waste management, recycling, or ensure compliance with Ontario’s regulations give us a call or check out our website here.

Soils Management – How it Affects your Project

Excess Soils Storage

Often unnoticed, overlooked and presumed innocuous soils are actually surprisingly important. Soils may have a substantial impact on your project; be it construction, remediation or improvement of existing property. As such it is important to understand the laws, regulations and nuances of managing excess soils or bringing soils to a site for use.

The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) has a series of best practices for the management of excess soils generated by construction projects which can be found here. The MOECC suggests wherever possible to reuse soils excavated at the site – for instance as landscaping, berms, or for re-grading – to minimize the amount of waste. If not reused at the site of excavation or another commercial fill site, excess soils are considered waste products and are subject to Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA) terms and conditions for disposal. This of course may be costly and logistically difficult if there are large volumes of soil to be disposed. Re-use or sale of excess soil is far more beneficial to your project, however the quality of the soil must be assessed prior to removal.

If your project is on the other side – in that it requires soils for re-grading, a commercial fill etc. – it is most likely worth seeking to use excess soils from a construction project’s excavation. This avoids the higher costs of purchasing soils from natural or virgin sources and transporting it potentially much longer distances and mitigating the associated environmental impacts.

Regardless of whether you intend to re-use, export or import soils for your project, the MOECC requires that the soils are analyzed and characterized by a Qualified Person – a professional geoscientist or professional engineer.  Cambium is an excess soils leader with many MOECC certified Qualified Persons that would be happy to assist you. See here for more information and please give us a call at 866-217-7900 if you have any questions.