Canada Day – the 150th Anniversary!

Photo Credit: Forester 401

What’s going on in Peterborough

Peterborough will be celebrating Canada’s 150th this weekend, and there are lots of things to do! If you’re in the city the Canada Day Parade will be happening on the 1st at 12:00 noon starting at Murray Street and moving down George Street to Morrow Park. The pre-parade ceremonies and entertainment begin at City hall around 9:00am and include a free pancake breakfast (thanks to the East City Lions Club)! In the evening starting at 8:00pm Peterborough’s Mucisfest is happy to present the three-time Juno award winner Kim Mitchell performing live at Del Crary park! Better yet, thanks to local sponsorship (including us here at Cambium) the concert is totally free!

Beyond Peterborough

This year being the big 150th anniversary, there is lots going on in the rest of the country as well. For example: with the free Discovery Pass, all Federal parks are free this summer, you can get your Discovery Pass here. Remember though provincial parks are separate. In Ontario, if you want to see the beautiful and historic Trent-Severn waterway, the locks are free to travel through this summer. This is particularly exciting for us here at Cambium as we have been working hard on several projects upgrading and repairing locks on the Trent-Severn – readying them for the extra traffic they will see this summer!

All of us here at Cambium are proud Canadians. We take great pride in our work maintaining Canada’s natural environment through our environmental work; ensuring the preservation of fragile ecosystems, the protection of threatened species and the safety of our water supply. We are also proud to contribute to Canada’s infrastructure and economy through our inspection and geotechnical services; ensuring the safety and quality of our countries’ built environment. Lastly we are proud of our contributions to Canadian society through our extensive charitable efforts – with a commitment to donating  1% of our yearly gross margins, regardless of whether we actually turned a profit or not.

Join us in celebrating our wonderful nation’s 150th, and reflect on how lucky we are to live in this beautiful country of ours!

Redside Dace now Listed as Endangered in Canada – What Does it Mean for You?

Photo Credit: K. Schmidt

Redside Dace are small freshwater fish that live in shallow streams and slow moving water. They range across the Northern United States and Southern Canada with populations concentrated around the GTA. They were added to the Species at Risk Act in 2009 due to diminishing populations from habitat loss and degradation. Redside Dace require gravel-bottomed waters with overhanging vegetation, much of which has been impacted by agricultural developments as well as diversion of streams and rivers. As of May 3rd, Redside Dace are federally listed as endangered in Canada affording them (and their habitats) substantial protections.

So what does this mean for you? The Provincial and Federal governments provide significant protections for species listed as threatened, endangered or extirpated which may affect any activity that will cause harm to the listed species or its habitat. When a species is listed, it is illegal to:

  • Kill, harm, harass, capture or take an individual of a listed species;
  • Possess, collect, buy, sell or trade an individual of a listed species, or any part or derivative of a listed species; and
  • Damage or destroy the residence of one or more individuals of a listed species.

This means that any activity that might affect Redside Dace’s habitat (such as storm water management systems, changing the course of a waterway, excessive sediment or removal of vegetation that might be associated with land development) is illegal without approval.  According to O. Reg. 242/08:

A person who wishes to carry out an activity [that affects Redside Dace habitat] shall comply with the following conditions:

Before beginning any part of the activity that is likely to kill, harm or harass Redside Dace or damage or destroy the habitat of Redside Dace,

i. The person must prepare a mitigation report in accordance with subsection (5),

ii. The person must submit the mitigation report to the district manager of the Ministry, and

iii. The district manager must approve the mitigation report, subject to subsection (6), and the person must have received written notice of the approval.

If you or your company are looking to do work that may affect endangered Redside Dace (or any other listed species) and require a mitigation report, or simply are unsure if your activity may affect an endangered species – give Cambium’s biology team a call, they will be happy to assist you! http://cambium-inc.com/biological-impact-assessment-and-monitoring.php

For more information, see: https://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/080242#BK28

Asbestos, a Dangerous Designated Substance Not Visible to the Eye

In a recent article, Asbestos Exposure is Still Making People Sick,  CNN reportes that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to see people suffer asbestos-related medical issues.

In Ontario, Designated Substances are defined as “a biological, chemical or physical agent to which the exposure of a worker is prohibited, regulated, restricted, limited or controlled.” Asbestos is one of 17 designated substances that present health and environmental risks. It can be found in a variety of everyday materials that may be present inside your work and home environment like vinyl sheet flooring, vinyl floor tiles, plaster, vermiculite insulation, ceiling tiles, drywall joint compound, and sealants.  It’s fibres are smaller than the diametre of human hair and even smaller than glass fibre. The risk for exposure and inhalation increase when the fibres are disturbed and exposed to air through the poor condition of the material, demolition/construction, or regular maintenance.

A problem with illnesses related to asbestos is the latency period. It takes a long time for the effects of asbestos exposure to develop and is hard to determine when the exposure happened to an individual.  In Ontario, asbestos is a designated substance and governed under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Regulation 278/05, Asbestos on Construction Projects and In Buildings and Repair operations.  It is important for businesses to have a non-intrusive compliance survey completed for the health and safety of your employees.  If the presence of asbestos is confirmed, a management plan is required to provide instructions and training for staff and maintenance on the proper procedures to prevent fibres and asbestos containing materials (ACM) from being exposed in the work environment.

Additionally, prior to any renovation or demolition, business and home owners hiring an independent contractor are required to complete an intrusive survey to determine the presence of materials which may be uncovered during those activities. Tearing down walls, removing ceiling tiles or insulation – these types of actions can disturb and release ACM fibres into the air.  It is always best to put the safety of your family, employees, and contractors first to ensure they are not exposed to this designated substance.

The removal, disposal and management of the asbestos abatement should be done by qualified professionals. Cambium specializes in Designated Substances Surveys (DSS), Asbestos and Hazardous Material Assessments. If you have any concerns or have questions, Cambium can assess and test for designated substances and develop an abatement plan to manage the removal.

Environmental Activity and Sector Registry: How will the Air Emissions EASR Impact Your Facility

A guide to the new Environmental Activity and Sector Registry

Sadie Bachynski, Project Manager with Cambium, has written a blog to answer a number of questions about what the Environmental Activity and Sector Registry (EASR) is, who it applies to and what it means to your operations.

What is the EASR?

After quite an extensive process of public consultations and stakeholder input, the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) is now operating the Environmental Activity and Sector Registry (EASR). The purpose of this new registry system is to provide a streamlined and easy approach to registering an activity that an individual or facility might be engaged in that releases any type of emission into the natural environment – as is required by the MOECC. Emissions may include air, noise and odourous emissions from a given site. This new system is an easy-to-access registry that can be found online on the Service Ontario website.

The idea behind this new system is fairly straightforward: if a person or business is emitting anything into the natural environment they must self-register online before they do so. The government of Ontario website puts this as: “O. Reg. 1/17 requires persons engaging in activities that discharge or may discharge contaminants to the natural environment, other than water, to register in the EASR unless the activities do not meet the criteria in the Regulation”.

Who does this apply to?

New and existing facilities are required to register if they make any modification to their emissions related activity. In essence this is a phasing out of the existing ECA process; however, if a person or business submitted an application for an activity outlined in O. Reg 1/17 on or before December 31, 2016 they will have the option of remaining in the current ECA process or withdraw their application and instead register with the EASR. If a facility receives an ECA process approval, the facility will have to register with the EASR by January 31, 2027 or when the modification to the facility/activity occurs. In essence, the MOECC is looking to phase out the ECA process for eligible EASR facilities by 2027 completely.

One of the major criterions of those who must apply to the EASR is the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code that they report under – these have carefully been assessed for potential environmental impact. Another major criterion is the complexity of the operations/activity being performed. In essence, anyone is eligible – unless the activity/operation in question is complex in nature and deemed to be a “potentially heavy emitter”. Complex operations remain under the realm of requiring an Environmental Compliance Approval from the MOECC. For more details on who is and is not eligible, see the link below to the full Regulation outline.

 

What does this mean for reporting?

This in no way alters the way a facility would have to assess, model, and even report on the air, noise and odour emissions. Nothing has changed in regards to registering – it is essentially the same as it would be for a full ECA in the sense that you still require full reports (or at least the associated screening to say that a report is not required). One difference is that the work is now to be signed off on by a professional engineer independent of the MOECC rather than by the MOECC. Specific documents related to a facility’s emissions of air, noise and odour will have to be supplied to the Ministry and the public and the detailed reports and any addendums made over time are to be kept at the facility.

 

Stellar Line-Up for Reframe Festival

Cambium is a proud sponsor of this year’s Reframe Film Festival taking place in late January in Peterborough. We are sponsoring When Two Worlds Collide scheduled to screen on Sunday, January 29th at 2:30 PM at The Venue. http://reframefilmfestival.ca/film/when-two-worlds-collide/

This highly credited film received Best Documentary special mention at the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival and a Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

Reframe Film Festival passes can be purchased in-person at the GreenUP store (Peterborough), or Happenstance Books and Yarn (Lakefield), or online at http://reframefilmfestival.ca/buy-tickets/.

Cambium supports a number of charities, events, and groups in the communities we work. We believe strongly in giving back by supporting initiatives that support a healthy natural environment, charitable initiatives, and events.